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3d printer and the Remington Hepburn

A couple of years ago I bought a Remington Hepburn rifle That was in very poor condition. I happen to like this style of action and wanted to reverse engineer it and make a new rifle. Orin, a friend of gun lab, also has an interest in this rifle and making one. I bought a set of prints from ASSRA as a starting point and started making a solid model of the rifle in solid works. When I finished my part I sent the drawings and all the components to Orin where he finished the drawings. The project has set as we still needed a few critical dimensions. Well then I get the word from Orin that he has bought a 3d printer and he has printed out the receiver and a cut away of it as well. This is that story.

This is the printer that he bought.

IMG_0883sAfter 3 hours of printing

IMG_0879sAfter 5 hours and 20 minutes

IMG_0877csAfter 9hours and 15 minutes the receiver is complete.

IMG_0875sThree views of the receiver after printing is complete.

IMG_0873s

IMG_0872s

IMG_0871sThe computer solid model as it looks prior to printing.

Hupburn Build 2The cut away model and some of the internal parts to allow testing of the model.

IMG_0887

This is a video of the process and progress of this project.

10 comments to 3d printer and the Remington Hepburn

  • Storm

    Didnt know printing was so slow!!

  • Dan

    I wish Orin has nothing but good luck with that printer. It looks like a CubeX printer, and those are not only difficult to get working well, but 3D Systems discontinued them because they did so poorly.

  • Orin

    @Dan

    They are really a POS as originally made but the basic mechanical design is great when compared to other printers. I bought the printer because 1) it was really cheap – $250+shipping – and 2) I can rip out the electronics and replace it with a decent controller and LCD display and 3)replace the printer hot end (nozzle assembly) with a E3D style hot end by making a simple adapter.

    I am in the process of designing an interface board that will mount where the original controller mounted, and also provide mounting for the “Smoothieboard” controller. The existing wiring harnesses will plug into the adapter board with no modifications and there will be plugs for jumper connectors between the Smoothieboard and the interface board and it will be plug-and-play if everything goes according to plan.

    3D Systems really made a decent controller using a 32 bit 80 MHz microprocessor but turned it into a crippled processor with the firmware and slicing (G code) software that was provided. They apparently spent all of their R&D money on the mechanical design and the firmware and software was an afterthought.

    • Dan

      Glad to hear you’re aware of the limitations, and you’re actively working around them. We used to have a CubeX Trio at work, and we got it somewhat functional after doing a complete electronics replacement and swapping out the vertical travel stepper motor. However, we had invested so much time in it at that point that the boss got fed up with it and sold it.

      • Orin

        Dan,
        Do you remember what controller board you used?
        The Smoothieboard looks to be the best choice out there now but I’m always looking….

        • Dan

          I believe we used an Arduino Mega 2560 with a RAMPS 1.4 board, loaded with Repetier. I don’t know why, I wasn’t the one who made that decision.

          • Orin

            Thanks Dan,

            I hope the Smoothieboard will work OK for this project and it can control both extruders on the CubeX Duo that I have.
            I’ve been in contact with the boards designer and he recommends using Smoothieware firmware and either Cura or Slic3r for the slicer.

            Right now I’m trying to learn how to use CircuitMaker to get the interface board designed and made.
            It’s a powerful circuit board design program abut a challenge to learn… :>)

  • […] Chuck of GunLab and his friend Orin have a dream: to wit, bringing a rare and “dead” single-shot design, the Remington Hepburn, back to life. To do this, Chuck got a scrapyard special Remington Hepburn and reverse-engineered the rusty, pitted action into SolidWorks. Then he passed the solid model to Orin, who tested it by 3D printing a model. […]

  • […] Chuck of GunLab and his friend Orin have a dream: to wit, bringing a rare and “dead” single-shot design, the Remington Hepburn, back to life. To do this, Chuck got a scrapyard special Remington Hepburn and reverse-engineered the rusty, pitted action into SolidWorks. Then he passed the solid model to Orin, who tested it by 3D printing a model. […]

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